Tag «Minecraft»

Raspberry Pi Minecraft Server 1.12.2 Installation Script / Optimization Guide

Many things have changed since I wrote my last Raspberry Pi Minecraft Server guide.  OpenJDK is now the better supported Java for Raspberry Pi and Oracle is discontinuing support for Java 8 in January 2019.  Java 9 is out and Java 10 is soon to follow.  The Raspberry Pi 3B+ has also arrived!  After testing the server on the new 3B+ using Java 9 I was blown away by the performance and decided to write an updated guide and a script that will have you up and running in minutes.

To give you a taste of how smooth the timings are in Java 9 OpenJDK headless using the Paper Spigot Minecraft Server here is a nearly 2 hour session I played with my girlfriend.  This was played in survival mode on a brand new server so no blocks had been pregenerated and no settings were modified from the defaults.  Nothing is overclocked except the SD card.  There was even a village right by the spawn so many entities were in use.  Here’s the timings output report:

Raspberry Pi Minecraft Server Timings

Raspberry Pi Minecraft V1.12 Server – Excellent Performance Guide

The world of color update 1.12 has finally arrived! This walk through will show you how to set up a playable Minecraft server running on the Raspberry Pi.

I have read many tutorials on Google about how to set up a “great performing” Minecraft server on your Raspberry Pi and have been sorely disappointed by the results. Most tutorials are very outdated and tell you to turn your view distance all the way down to 4 (meaning you can’t see very far), or turn your entities (monsters/animals) down to settings so low that they hardly spawn or you can walk right up next to them before you see you.  After much research, trial and error, and spending time in the #Paper IRC channel talking to the smartest people in the Minecraft server configuration world I have been able to get the Minecraft Server (popular Paper fork based on Spigot) to run at vanilla settings (view distance 10, no reduction in entity settings). This means the server is suitable for full survival mode just like a regular vanilla Minecraft server.

Should you try this?

Let me answer a big question right off the bat. Should you buy a Raspberry Pi just to run it as a Minecraft server? Absolutely not. If you just want to run a Minecraft server, especially one with more than a few people, you are much better off buying a realms subscription or one of the many dedicated Minecraft server options. $35 would get you approximately 6 months of a Realms server and probably much more from private hosts. You may also be better off just running the server off your own computer because your CPU and RAM in a desktop class machine is almost certainly going to be better than a Pi.  However, if you already have a Pi just laying around or want to use it to learn a bunch of cool new stuff like setting up a headless Linux server on an embedded device then by all means proceed. It’s a great setup to play Minecraft with a few friends.

Second big question: Do you have a good SD card? Because this tutorial will overclock your SD port from 50hz to 100hz. If you have a good Sandisk/Samsung name brand class 10 card you should have no problems. However, although the risk is minimal, there is some risk of SD card corruption if you don’t have a high quality card. I am not responsible if your card dies,
your Pi explodes, your house gets hit by a meteorite, or anything else that happens! This is solely at your own risk!
These are very common overclocks though and the risk is minimal, but you have been warned!

If you are prepared to continue, then read on!